Electroencephalography (EEG)
Transcranial Doppler (TCD)
Needle Electromyography (EMG) Test
Nerve Conduction Study (NCS)


***Dr. Cha does not perform the following scans but orders them to be performed at a specific facility if they are deemed necessary.


MRI scan
CT scan



Electroencephalography (EEG)

EEG refers to the recording of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity over a short period of time, usually 20–40 minutes, as recorded from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. In neurology, the main diagnostic application of EEG is in the case of epilepsy, as epileptic activity can create clear abnormalities on a standard EEG study. A secondary clinical use of EEG is in the diagnosis of coma, encephalopathies, and brain death. A third clinical use of EEG is for studies of sleep and sleep disorders where recordings are typically done for one full night, sometimes more.

How to prepare for the EEG:
Adjust your sleeping schedule. If your physician ordered a sleep test, you may be asked to sleep less the night before and to avoid caffeine drinks (tea, coffee, cola).
Wash your hair thoroughly. Your scalp must be clean and oil free. Do not use conditioners, hair spray, etc. Dry your hair completely.
Eat before being tested. Two hours before the EEG, eat a regular meal (or at least a snack) to help stabilize blood sugar level. (Note: for some tests, you may be asked not to eat.)
Take your normal medication. If you normally take medication, continue to do so. But be sure you have informed your physician of all medications you’re taking and follow his or her instructions.

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Transcranial Doppler (TCD)

Transcranial Doppler (TCD) study is an ultrasound imaging test of the brain used for analyzing blood flow in the major intracranial arteries and veins and allows determining the velocity of intracranial blood flow. It is a totally noninvasive, painless test and usually takes 30 minutes. No preparations are necessary, but if you have any recent eye surgeries, please notify the technologist of it. After the test, you are allowed to drive and may return to home or work. The test results will be analyzed and the report will be mailed to your doctor. 

 

MRI scan ***

An MRI scan is a medical imaging technique used in radiology that utilizes a large, powerful, magnet to visualize internal structures of the body in detail. MRI makes use of the property of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to image nuclei of atoms inside the body. Dr. Cha does not perform these tests but orders them to be performed at a specific facility.


If a contrast agent is needed, you'll be given an injection. Let the technologist know if you feel sick or experience any discomfort. If you feel anxious when the scanning table slides into the interior of the giant magnet, you can usually talk to the technologist over the intercom or signal for attention in some way. You will hear some knocking or thumping sounds. Check to see if earphones and music are available. It is important to stay still so the images do not blur. Try to relax!


Pregnant women are not advised to have MRI scans. Tell a technologist if your body contains an implanted electronic device or a metal object that contains iron.

 

CT scan ***
 CT scan is a medical imaging procedure that utilizes computer-processed X-rays to produce tomographic images or 'slices' of specific areas of the body. These cross-sectional images are used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in various medical disciplines. Dr. Cha does not perform these tests but orders them to be performed at a specific facility.

If you are to undergo a CT scan, let your doctor know if you have any allergies (particularly to iodine) or if you have any kidney problems. Pregnant women are not advised to have CT scans since the radiation may hurt the unborn baby.



​Needle Electromyography (EMG) Test

An EMG test detects, measures, and records the electrical activity produced by skeletal muscles. EMG and NCS are important diagnostic tools that detect the cause of problems, such as muscle weakness, numbness, spasms, paralysis or pain, and determine if the problem involves the nerves, muscles, spinal cord or brain. They can help diagnose pinched nerves, inflamed muscles, carpal tunnel syndrome, primary muscle disorders, neuromuscular disorders, or nerve disorders.

  
Nerve Conduction Study (NCS)

NCS can measure the speed and intensity of electrical signals that travel along nerves, and time it takes muscle to respond to these signals. EMG and NCS are important diagnostic tools that detect the cause of problems, such as muscle weakness, numbness, spasms, paralysis or pain, and determine if the problem involves the nerves, muscles, spinal cord or brain. They can help diagnose pinched nerves and inflamed muscles, carpal tunnel syndrome, primary muscle disorders, neuromuscular disorders, nerve disorders.


How to prepare for the EMG or NCS test:
Bathe or shower on the day of your test. Wash your arms and legs to remove body oils. Do not use any bath oils, lotions or creams. Oils can interfere with your test
Eat your normal meals at your usual times. You may be asked to avoid tobacco and caffeine for a few hours before your test.
Tell your health care provider about all the medications you’re taking, especially any blood thinners. Also, be sure to tell him or her if you:
bruise easily
have hemophilia or diabetes
have a pacemaker
have a skin infection

Allow plenty of time to avoid feeling rushed. Be sure to ask any questions you may have.
Relax to ensure accurate results. Tense muscles can interfere with your test. Wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothes. Keep your arms and legs warm and relaxed. Don’t be afraid to talk about your feelings to help relieve any anxiety or fear that you may have.

































Services Provided

Tim Cha, MD Neurology